Why Leaders Are Asking, “What’s Next?”

Do you find fulfillment in the work you do?

Summary
Transcript

Julie Bauke, strategic career advisor and workplace expert at The Bauke Group, describes why leaders, regardless of age, are asking themselves, “What’s next?”

“They want to know, is this all there is? What can I possibly do next? How can I take my career and make it matter, make it more meaningful?” says Julie. “Those questions are really front and center for so many leaders these days that it's not just a fluke. It's really something we're seeing that I would call a trend or a phenomenon.”

Watch the video to learn why leaders should have a defined purpose so they will always know the answer to, “What’s next?”

One of the things that we're seeing with our executive clients these days is this sense of, is this all there is? And, you know, I think we used to see that later in life but we're seeing it earlier in people's careers now. I liken it to the things we hear from millennials: "I want to be happy. I want my work to matter," which we roll our eyes at, those of us who aren't millennials. But we're hearing the same things from people in their mid-to-late 40s to early 50s. They want to know, is this all there is? What can I possibly do next? How can I take my career and make it matter, make it more meaningful? How can I get happier at work?

There's just this general sense of yearning and longing for something more at work. You know, the whole concept of retirement is so different than it used to be. So the countdown, "I've got 5 years, 10 years left to retire," has changed because people aren't retiring like they used to. So people in their 40s and 50s are looking at the runway ahead of them and they're saying, "Wow, I have an awful lot of time left to work," and they're asking themselves big questions that are also scary questions. They're looking around and saying, "Is this what I want to do?" And a lot of times the answer is no. And that can be sometimes because of what's gone on at the organization. Maybe they don't like what they see coming down the road or even more often, it's something they're feeling in themselves.

I have a yearning to do something more or something different. Maybe they've gotten to the age where the kids are a little more independent. Maybe they're off at college. And they've made enough mistakes and hit their head enough times that they know that there are certain things they like, certain things they want to do more of, but there's also a lot of things they want to do less of or never again. And so those questions are really front and center for so many leaders these days that it's not just a fluke. It's really something we're seeing that I would call a trend or a phenomenon.

You know, men especially are really used to putting their head down and just moving forward and really not asking themselves those questions. Do I like what I'm doing? Am I happy? I think women generally do a better job of asking themselves those questions or discussing it with others. But we're seeing in men much more of an interest and a tendency to ask those questions. Now the answers aren't always readily available but I think the first part is if you're willing to ask yourself that question, you're generally also willing to go on the journey, the challenging journey to find the answer.
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Julie Bauke

Julie Bauke is The Chief Career Happiness Officer of The Bauke Group. She is as serious about your Career Happiness as she is her own — and she is deadly serious about hers.

She started The Bauke Group after a lifetime of bel...

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