Reflection for the Sake of Innovation

Does observation make you more innovative?

Summary
Transcript

Derreck Kayongo, founder of the Global Soap Project, explains why leaders must take time out of their days to observe and reflect to encourage innovation.

“Innovation and entrepreneurship have a lot to do with observation,” shares Derreck. “You've got to really spend at least, in my view, one or two hours every day to really take the day back and say what am I doing and what needs to be improved, what needs to be adjusted. And entrepreneurs tend to have that space to sit down and look at problems that are surrounding them and to actually innovate around them.”

Watch the video to learn more from Derreck.

Most people don't pay attention to the environment in which they exist. Why? Because they have the profanatory work of getting up in the morning at eight and going to do the nine to eight or nine to five or nine to whatever they have—people are busy. Trying to pay bills. And that doesn't always lend itself to innovation and entrepreneurship.

Innovation and entrepreneurship have a lot to do with observation. You've got to really spend at least, in my view, one or two hours every day to really take the day back and say what am I doing and what needs to be improved, what needs to be adjusted. And entrepreneurs tend to have that space to sit down and look at problems that are surrounding them and to actually innovate around them. It's not just a unique American thing that most people are not reactive to ideas, it's a global thing. It's a global phenomenon. People are busy. Americans, for example, don't take vacation. Very few Americans take vacation. Why? Because, somehow, 61 percent of them are convinced that if they take vacations, they're gonna be replaced. So, if you're really worried about yourself and your work and paying the bills, what time do you have to create and be innovative and observe? So, yeah. I think that's a global phenomenon.

Most of that is because people just don't want the burden and responsibility that it costs for you to get into the innovation space. It's a risk. And most people don't like to be risky. People want to be safe. And nothing has ever been built in safety. We have a group of people that have to take on that role. And when I realize that I could be one of those people, I realize that I needed to really dig in, and know that it may not even pay off. But that what I do with my skills and talents, if I can actually innovate around particular ideas and become a leader in that space, that my children would benefit from it. And other people's children would benefit from it. So, it's this idea of some of us are here to sacrifice our lives to do the work that you need to self improve the whole community. It's not for everybody is what I'm saying.
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Derreck Kayongo

Derreck Kayongo was born January 25, 1970, in Kampala, Uganda, just before General Idi Amin Dada seized power in a military coup. The new regime became known for its brutality, and today Idi Amin is one of history's most notorious dic...

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