Leading With Consistency

Do you understand the principles of leadership worth following?

Summary
Transcript

Julie Bauke tells us that leaders with a "Do as I say, not as I do" mentality are doomed for failure. To deliver leadership worth following, Julie says, you must be intentional about how your advice and direction to your followers align with how you yourself are behaving.

Have you ever caught yourself telling your team one thing and doing another? How did that affect your team’s performance? Please tell us in the comments below.

Effective leaders need to realize that everything they do and say is being watched. The people who report to you notice inconsistencies -- times when you talk the talk but don’t walk the walk.

It’s critical to be specific and intentional about how your advice and counsel to your team really line up with how you yourself behave, because if you take on a team management philosophy of “do as I say, not as I do,” you’re sunk.

It can be as simple as if you say, “We want an open communication policy here,” and then are always behind the closed door.

When you do make that mistake, one of the best things you can do to with your organization is admit it and just say, “I’m going to work really hard to make sure that I’m holding myself to the same standards as you, and you have my permission, if I don’t, to point it out to me.” Then when someone points it out to you, don’t jump on them. Say thank you and admit that you’ll keep trying.

When we’re in leadership positions, no one expects you to be perfect. Sometimes we get these big titles, and we think we need to act like we’re perfect. Your team is watching you, and they know you’re not, so you’re just setting yourself up for a failure.

I think leaders need to realize that everything they do and say is being watched. It's being scrutinized potentially, and the folks that report to you a lot of times are looking for consistency, inconsistency, times when you talk the talk, but don't walk the walk. As leaders sometimes we can think that people really aren't paying attention, but you really are being watched, and so therefore being able to really be very specific and intentional about how your advice and how your counsel and how your direction to your folks really lines up with how you yourself are behaving is critical, because if you take on a management philosophy as do as I say, not as I do, you're sunk. It can be as simple as if you say, "We want an open communication policy here. We want an open door policy," and that leader is always behind the closed door. Or they're on you about not following up. So one time I knew somebody who was just a real stickler about following up, about communicating openly and clearly and following up to the point that he would openly berate people in meetings if he felt they were falling short of that standard. Yet he himself was notorious for never following up, never closing the loop, never getting back to people when he said he was going to. So he held everyone in the group to a higher standard that he himself wasn't marching to. When that happens, people are watching you and they're saying, "You know what? It's good for me I guess, but not for you." Then you get a lot of well let's say eye rolling and people not following you when it comes to the big stuff. One of the best things you can do to really get face back with your organization is admit it and just say, "You know, it's come to my attention," and maybe this is through an employee survey or somebody takes you aside and says it, "I've been telling you one thing and I've been doing the other. Shame on me for not recognizing that, but it's now been brought to my attention and I'm going to work really hard to make sure that I'm holding myself to the same standards. You have my permission, if I'm not, to point it out to me." Then when someone points it out to you, don't jump on them. Say thank you and admit that you'll keep trying. When we're in leadership roles, no one expects you to be perfect. Sometimes we get these big titles, and we think we need to act like we're perfect. Well, I'm sorry. Everybody is watching you. They know you're not, and you're just setting yourself up for a failure.
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Julie Bauke

Julie Bauke is The Chief Career Happiness Officer of The Bauke Group. She is as serious about your Career Happiness as she is her own — and she is deadly serious about hers.

She started The Bauke Group after a lifetime of bel...

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