Departing From the Organization You Founded

Are you departing with maximum class and minimum drama?

Summary
Transcript

Glen Jackson, co-founder of marketing and communications agency Jackson Spalding, shares his tips for founders and co-founders who are ready to move on from the organization they worked so hard to build.

“Depart with maximum class and minimum drama,” advises Glen. “The goal should be to quietly leave it, maybe leave it a little earlier than people expected, because you have so much trust in the leadership team you built. You know it's just going to continue to perpetuate and get better. You gotta let go and let your business grow. You've got to let go of some things.”

Watch the video to hear more tips from Glen on effective succession planning.

As a co-founder of the business, some things that are very important to me, I think for any founders or co-founders of businesses, you don't want to be foundering your business as a co-founder and a founder. In other words, you don't want to be impeding it. And there are several things I think you've got to remember if you're a founder or a co-founder of a business that are really important. You want to establish a legacy of leadership within your business important to that inner circle you've established.

Secondly, you want to help but not hinder your business. Focus on the areas where you can help your business as you get older as a co-founder or a founder. You want to teach, not preach. Be careful there. You don't want to be preaching, you want to be teaching and you want to make sure that when you depart, you depart with maximum class and minimum drama. I see that happening too often sometimes that there's too much drama when a founder of a business or a co-founder leaves the company. The goal should be to quietly leave it, maybe leave it a little earlier than people expected, because you have so much trust in the leadership team you built. You know it's just going to continue to perpetuate and get better. You gotta let go and let your business grow. You've got to let go of some things.

As a co-founder of a business, for me, I focus on three-two counts, not three-one counts. You know, in baseball, when it's three balls and one strike, the header at the plate still has some head room if you will, to maybe miss the ball, he's got another ball. But the three-two counts I think is where you want to be as you grow in your leadership. When there's three balls and two strikes, and the bases are loaded, you want to be there for those three-two counts and deliver and hit that ball down past third base.

So, focus on those three-two counts, not three-one counts. Make sure you're not foundering the business by doing some things that I just listed. And leave and depart the right time with minimum drama and maximum class.
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Glen Jackson

Glen Jackson co-founded Jackson Spalding in 1995. He provides leadership for the agency, many of its clients and organizations looking for inspiration. He has special expertise in real estate, professional services, crisis communicat...

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