The Leadercast Podcast Episode 01: Leaders Are People Who Care With Tripp Crosby


The definition of what makes a leader worth following can vary depending on whom you ask.

For Tripp Crosby, director and founding principal at Green Tricycle Studios and host of Leadercast Live 2018, his definition is simple: Leaders are people who care.

We had the privilege of interviewing Tripp as our first guest on The Leadercast Podcast, and we covered everything from his leadership influences to some of his favorite moments at past Leadercast Live events, which he’s hosted for the past eight years. Here are a couple of lessons Tripp shares in the interview:

> Being a leader doesn’t mean you have all the answers.

We asked Tripp to share on the leaders who have helped shape him into the leader he is today. One of his greatest influencers was none other than Andy Stanley, founder and pastor of North Point Ministries, author and veteran Leadercast Live speaker who will be joining us again this year.

In the early 2000s, Tripp took a job at Andy’s church making videos: one of the best jobs he ever had, he says. But he came from a different church where there had been a heightened sense of self-importance. The first task he’d been given there was to make a video series to teach everyone else how to do church like that church.

He didn’t know how much that bothered him until his very first staff meeting with Andy, who took time to remind all of the staff that he didn’t necessarily know if what they were doing was the best or right thing, but it was the best he knew to do—and it was worth the risk.

It was Tripp’s first exposure to a leader being so honest about his own limitations and admitting it was all an experiment. That sort of humility impacted him. “As a leader, I try to not be the person with all the answers, but the person with the best questions,” says Tripp.  “As a leader, I try to not be the person with all the answers, but the person with the best questions." — Tripp Crosby

> You have to know your faults.

Media production is like a lot of industries in the idea that time equals money. Someone’s paying for what’s happening on set, and every hour that goes by is money spent. On set, Tripp’s role is to lead his team to create all of the right shots, to tell the right story and to send the right message.

Needless to say, the pressure can oftentimes be high.

Tripp says that if something isn’t right, it’s ultimately his fault, so he’s learned to cast his vision early on. But casting a vision isn’t as much about what the shoot is as much as it is how he’s going to lead his team.

He warns them about his own flaws ahead of time, that he’s probably going to push them harder than they want to be pushed and rush them at times. He apologizes in advance and gives every single person permission to stop him when he pushes too hard.

Laying a foundation like that makes a massive difference and sets the tone for the project. He encourages his team to give him feedback, just as he would for them.

“There’s nothing worse than being with someone who has a character flaw and you know they don’t know,” says Tripp. “But when they know, there’s a connection. They’re open to feedback, and they want to be better.”  “There’s nothing worse than being with someone who has a character flaw and you know they don’t know... But when they know, there’s a connection. They’re open to feedback, and they want to be better.” — Tripp Crosby

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*This post is based on a podcast interview with Tripp Crosby from Green Tricycle Studios. To hear this episode, and many more like it, please subscribe to The Leadercast Podcast. If you don’t use iTunes, you can listen to every episode on SpotifyGoogle Play or Stitcher.

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